Volume 6, Issue 4 (2018)                   IQBQ 2018, 6(4): 235-240 | Back to browse issues page

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Sinaei M, Bolouki M, Mirshekar D. Temperature-Based Prediction of Sex Ratio in Hatchlings Green Sea Turtle (Chelonia mydas). IQBQ. 2018; 6 (4) :235-240
URL: http://journals.modares.ac.ir/article-24-18964-en.html
1- Fisheries Department, Chabahar Branch, Islamic Azad University, Chabahar, Iran , oceanography.sina@gmail.com
2- Marine Scince Department, Marine Science Faculty, Marine Science & Technology University of Khoramshahr, Khoramshahr, Iran
3- Marine Scince Department, Marine Science & Technology Faculty, Science & Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran
Abstract:   (90 Views)
Aims: It has been shown that sea turtles have temperature-dependent sex determination. Therefore, their sex determination is useful in understanding their reproduction ecology and population status. The aims of the present study were to estimate the sex ratio and to study the effect of inundation on the sex ratio of the hatchling green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas).
Materials & Methods: This experimental study was carried out on the 300km of Chabahar Beach on the northern coast of the Sea of Oman in July to December, 2015. Five areas which have the highest densities of nesting green sea turtles were chosen. The temperature of three different depths of green sea turtle clutches laid (50cm; above the egg hole, 85cm; center of egg hole and 120cm; below the egg hole) were recorded using automated intra-nest recording devices. Linear Regression Analysis and Pearson correlation coefficient were used. Statistical analyses of the data were conducted by SPSS 20 and Microsoft Office Excel 2010.
Findings: The statistical mean temperature in thermosensitive period (TSP) of the nests at three depths of 50cm, 85cm, and 120cm at the chabahar beaches were recorded between 26.1±1.1 to 30.6±1.0. The storm had decreased the mean temperature in thermosensitive period of the nests.
Conclusions: The storm decreases the mean temperature in thermosensitive period of the nests. The Nilofar storm stops the increasing feminization. It can be an important step in the implementation of conservation, rehabilitation, and reconstruction programmers.
Full-Text [PDF 374 kb]   (25 Downloads)    

Received: 2018/04/15 | Accepted: 2018/09/11 | Published: 2018/11/21
* Corresponding Author Address: Fisheries Department, Chabahar Branch, Islamic Azad University, Chabahar, Iran. Postal Code: 9971774615

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